THC

Examine suggests that girls are extra delicate to THC than males

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Although stereotypes and easy access suggest that more men smoke cannabis than women, it is generally believed that the plant affects gender in a similar way. However, a recent study by the University of Toronto suggests that there are some significant gender differences, with THC affecting women more.

The study, published in Psychopharmacology magazine, gathered 91 volunteers between the ages of 19 and 25 and let them smoke a joint with either 12.5% ​​THC or a placebo. Participants were monitored for vital signs and later asked to complete cognitive tasks and performance scales to measure their reactions and how much they were affected by marijuana.

“However, I would like to emphasize here that the participants in our study could smoke the amount of cannabis they wanted. When participants smoke to the desired high, we call it "titration to effect," explains Justin Matheson, the study's lead author is done quickly so that users can feel the high while still smoking. "

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"We found that women smoked less cannabis, had less THC in their blood, and still had the same acute effects as men," he says. "So I think women mostly need a lower dose of THC to get the same level of poisoning as men."

Photo by Elle Hughes via Pexels

This phenomenon is not known, but one theory the researchers put forward is that estrogen, a primarily female hormone, could affect the metabolism of THC. Estrogen levels could account for the differences found in the study and the reactions women experience when consuming THC.

CONNECTED: How marijuana affects men and women differently

Not many studies have been done on cannabis and the differences in the compound depending on the gender of the person who consumes it. Matheson explains that while more research needs to be done on the subject, it is important for doctors and scientists to recognize that previous studies have excluded women and that our understanding of medicine is geared towards men.

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Beth Edmonds